Monthly Archives:July 2018

preparing for a CII R0 exam

When preparing for a CII R0 exam, what can you learn from the England football team?

Today is July 10th 2018 – the day before the semi-final with Croatia. Whatever the result tomorrow, it’s already been a good World Cup for little-fancied England football team.

We sailed through the quarter-finals against Sweden and won against Colombia in the dreaded penalty shootout. It feels like a different England side and, in many ways, it is. Forget about the youthfulness of the side or the formation used by the manager. The real difference is the team’s mindset and their preparedness.

There are some lessons here for anyone who is preparing for a CII R0 exam.

England taking penalties: the history

When it comes to England and penalty shootouts, it usually ends in tears. Before England defeated Colombia on penalties to reach the quarter-finals of the 2018 World Cup, England hadn’t won a shootout at a major tournament since 1996. They had never won a penalty shootout at a World Cup. Despite winning against Colombia, England still have the worst penalty record in senior world football. They have lost three out of four World Cup penalty shoot-outs.

Despite this awful record, there is a widely reported fact that would make any England football fan incandescent with rage. Most of the England teams in the past have never practised taking penalties. Apparently they aren’t worth it because it’s impossible to replicate the pressure they face in a real game.

England taking penalties: what’s different this time?

Gareth Southgate has put an end to this nonsense. He has selected players and insisted that they practice taking penalties. To make it as realistic as possible, this practice takes place at the end of the normal practice session when the players are most tired. After all, in the real thing, you won’t usually go to penalties unless you’ve been running around for at least 120 minutes and are tired. In addition to this, all the players now have a routine. So even when under the greatest of pressure, they are able to replicate what they do on the practice ground.

You only have to look at Harry Kane to see how he holds the ball and carefully places the ball on the penalty spot. He then adjusts his left sock, takes three steps back, picks a spot, and then scores. All of this is fully rehearsed, practised, and perfectly executed (at least up until now!).

Finally, all of the England penalty takers have apparently been psychologically profiled to see how they stand up under the pressures of a penalty shootout. All in all, he hasn’t left anything to chance – and so far it’s worked superbly.

What about preparing for a CII R0 exam?

What can we learn from this when preparing for a CII R0 exam? The simple message from the England football team is that success starts on the practice ground. When sitting a R0 exam, your practice pitch is what you do when you are studying. So you have to get this right and not leave anything to chance.

Whether you are sitting R01, R02, R03, R04 or R05, you will need to successfully answer enough multiple-choice questions to pass. It is a surprise to me that so many people who sit these R0 exams don’t do enough of this. They either leave exam practice until the last minute (when they feel they are fully prepared), or don’t practice at all. The danger is that this is preparing to fail.

Preparing for a CII R0 exam: what do we suggest?

  • If you already have some industry experience on the subject that you are sitting, then sit the CII exam guide at the start of your revision. Whether you are sitting R01, R02, R03, R04 or R05, you will get the exam guide when you enrol for your exam. Sitting this at the start of your revision might be a painful experience, but it gets you used to the style of the exam. It will reinforce what you know and identify where the gaps in your knowledge are.
  • Sit this exam paper again around a week away from your exam sitting. This makes sure you sit the CII exam guide at least twice. There is nothing else that is available that is likely to be as close to the standard in the actual exam that you will sit.
  • In addition, you will also automatically get access to the CII RevisionMate multiple-choice practice questions. Although these are intended to test your learning, these aren’t a million miles away from exam standard. So make sure that you use them – you have paid for them as part of your exam entry.
  • Make sure you sit as many other additional practice questions as you can. These can be purchased from various training providers. Additional question packs are also available from the CII for R01, R02, R03, R04, and R05 for a relatively small additional cost. In our opinion, these are well worth the money.

The emphasis here is the need to complete practice questions under exam conditions. You might have noticed that nowhere, so far, have I talked about reading the study text from cover to cover. I accept that somebody with relatively limited experience of a R0 exam subject matter may need to read some of the study text first. For many, we believe that the best way to prepare for the R0 exam is to practise as many questions as you can (using the study guide as a reference source).

As the England football team have found, success is about investing time in what really matters. Success in your exam will be driven by not only how hard you work, but how effective it is. Practice makes perfect and rarely have we seen such a clear example of this as in the 2018 World Cup.

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Prepare well and be successful.

The Diploma Doctor